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Naturally Colored Food

July 22, 2015

Use the natural colors of food to receive every color spectrum. This antioxidant rich program of whole foods will help you raise your metabolism, eat without dieting, teach your kids about nutrition and how to love healthy food, and help you overcome obstacles such as depression and disease. 

This holistic approach makes nutrition practical, defines what to buy at the grocery store and how to minimize allergic reactions to foods by consuming them in their whole natural state in all colors, successful in graduating the patient to a healthful lifestyle. Discover how to substitute food colorings for the benefit of naturally colored foods, providing a balanced spectrum to the body.

You can use The Rainbow Program in support groups, health food stores, hospital programs or counseling. It works well with both children and adults, and is designed to cross language and cultural barriers.

Foods in the Rainbow Program are categorized by color. Selecting colored foods is one of the first steps in good nutrition. Brightly colored foods are higher in nutrients, and nourish the body without added sugar or food colorings. They also help protect the body from conditions such as free-radical damage and oxidation of cells.

The Rainbow Program suggests eating one selection from each color group each day (red through pink) on our whole foods list to stimulate the different organs and organ systems. This is called a rotation. If this is repeated twice, then the person has consumed two rotations.

Fruits and vegetables contain various antioxidants in the form of carotenes, anthocyanidins, and phytochemicals which help fight the free radicals that lead to cancer.

To obtain the full spectrum of red lycopene, orange carotenes, through purple anthocyanidins: phytochemicals present in whole foods, it is necessary that we consume a variety of seasonal fresh produce. The Rainbow Program encourages people to get a broad spectrum of nutrients and colors.

Emily Isaacson writes on transitioning to colored foods, rich in antioxidants, from the white flour and white sugar so common in today's marketplace. Stay tuned...

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